Fifa World Cup Stats Record And History

Fifa World Cup Stats: We present to you the figures and statistics of the World Cup through its long history through the championships and crowns achieved by the teams, in addition to records of matches, scorers and public attendance.

Fifa World Cup Stats Record And History:

The FIFA World Cup is the most prominent global football event, and one of the most watched sporting events in the world. The World Cup is held under the supervision of the International Federation of Football Associations (FIFA), which was founded on May 21, 1904 in Paris.

World Cup Card:

  • First World Cup: 1930
  • Supervising The World Cup: FIFA
  • The Number Of Copies Of the World Cup: 20 Copies
  • When Is The World Cup Held: Every 4 years
  • Last World Cup Champion: France
  • The Team With The Most Participation In The World Cup: Brazil (20)
  • The Team With The Most World Cup Titles: Brazil (5)
  • All-time World Cup Goalscorer: Miroslav Klose (16)
  • Most Capped Player in World Cup history: Lothar Matthews (25)
  • The Player With the most World Cup Titles: Pele (3).

The Idea Of ​​Holding The World Cup:

The founding meeting of FIFA was attended by representatives of the Netherlands, France, Belgium, Sweden, Switzerland and Spain. The banker, Karl Herr Schmann, representative of the Netherlands at this meeting, suggested the establishment of a World Football Championship, but this proposal did not win the support of the rest of the members, due to the limited financial capabilities of the new union.

However, this proposal found its way to the light later thanks to the vigor and activity of the French Jules Rimet and Henri Dillon, Jules Rimet was elected President of the Federation, and became the second of his closest aides.

The football tournament at that time was held within the Olympic Games, and only amateurs participated in it, and the spread of the professionalism of the round witch led to thinking about the establishment of the World Cup in professional football as well.

The History Of The World Cup:

Sir Thomas Lipton is the founder of the Thomas Lipton Cup, sometimes referred to as the first FIFA Club World Cup.

The first international football match was held in 1872 between the teams of Scotland and England and ended in a goalless draw. The first international tournament was the British Championship, which took place in 1884 and at this point the sport was rarely played outside Great Britain and Ireland.

The International Federation Of Football:

After the establishment of the International Football Association (FIFA) in 1904, there was an attempt by the Federation to organize an international football tournament between nations, outside the Olympic framework in Switzerland in 1906, and this was the first beginning of international football.

As the Olympic event continued with the participation of amateur teams, Sir Thomas Lipton organized the “Sir Thomas Lipton Cup” in Turin in 1909, a competition for professionals and the Lipton Championship was between clubs (not national teams) from different countries, each of them representing the entire country and sometimes referred to as It is the first World Cup at club level.

In 1914, FIFA agreed to recognize the Olympic tournament as the world’s amateur football tournament, and took responsibility for managing the event. And this paved the way for the first competition football intercontinental in the world, in the summer 1920 Olympic Games.

After that, the Uruguayan football team won the Olympic football championships in 1924 and 1928, and in 1928 the International Football Association decided to organize its own international tournament outside the Olympic Games.

Uruguay Hosts The First Edition Of The World Cup:

With Uruguay being the official football champions at the time, and to celebrate the centenary of Uruguayan independence in 1930, FIFA made Uruguay the host country for the first ever World Cup.

Create A World Cup Championship:

The idea of ​​holding the World Cup dates back to the first meeting of the International Football Association in 1904 in Paris, with the presence of seven countries, namely Switzerland, Belgium, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden.

Where the International Federation adopted the idea of ​​​​establishing a World Football Championship, after the decision took a long time to agree on it due to several difficulties. The most prominent of these difficulties was the rejection of the idea of ​​​​the tournament by the International Olympic Committee for fear of its impact on the ancient Olympic Games, as well as for fear of the International Federation controlling the game. The most popular in the world.

Jules Rimet, The Founder Of The World Cup:

The idea rose again in 1921 at the hands of the French lawyer Jules Rimet, who later became president of the International Federation and who worked hard to launch the first World Football Championship, and seven years after his appointment to the presidency, the International Federation agreed in a historic meeting held on May 25, 1928 to Adoption of the World Cup Championship, and naming it the Victory Cup.

Uruguay submitted a request to organize the World Cup, and it was approved, given that it was the leader of the teams at the time and the champion of the last two Olympics. Two years before the start of the first World Cup competitions, the instructions stipulated that there should be a valuable prize to be presented to the winning team, which prompted them to establish the Victory Cup ( the Jules Rimet Cup). The tournament was launched for the first time in 1930 and continues every four years until today.

World Cup 1930:

In 1930, the first international football tournament was held under the name ( World Cup ), which is the 1930 World Cup, which was hosted by Uruguay in the period from 13-30 July.

All teams affiliated with FIFA were invited to participate in the tournament. As a whole, 13 countries participated in the first tournament. The lack of participating teams is due to the choice of Uruguay as the venue for the competition, the time of the trip and the costs of travel across the Atlantic make participation difficult for European teams.

The first two World Cup matches took place live, in which France and the United States, who beat Mexico 4-1, and Belgium 3-0, respectively, won.

The First Goal In The History Of The World Cup

The first goal in the history of the World Cup was scored by French Lucien Laurent. In the final match, Uruguay beat Argentina 4-2 in front of a huge crowd of 93,000 fans, in Montevideo, and Uruguay became the first country to win the cup.

Argentina’s Francisco Varaio is the last player to die in the 1930 World Cup final, when he died on August 30, 2010.

World Cup 1934:

In the 1934 World Cup, Italy was chosen to host the tournament, after the International Football Association (FIFA) nominated it after the Berlin Conference in October 1932.

And then Italy was chosen to host the 1934 World Cup at the meeting that was held in Stockholm, the capital of Sweden, on October 9, 1932.

It is considered the first qualifying tournament to be played, after 32 countries decided to participate in the tournament, and therefore it was necessary to hold qualifiers for 16 countries to qualify.

1934 World Cup Final:

The 1934 World Cup Final was held at the National Fascist Party Stadium, where Czechoslovakia advanced with the result, but Italy scored the equalizer in the last minutes and then added the second goal in extra time to crown the title for the first time in the history of Italy.

World Cup 1938:

In the 1938 World Cup, France was chosen to host the tournament, which took place from June 4 to July 19, 1938, and this decision by the International Football Association (FIFA) to host the third edition of the tournament, caused anger in the Latin continent, where it was believed that hosting is based on alternating between The two continents.

As a result of this decision, Uruguay and Argentina did not participate in the tournament, and at the same time, Spain did not participate in the finals, due to the continuing flames of the civil war.

1938 World Cup Final:

The 1938 World Cup Final was held at the Olympic Stadium in Paris, where the meeting witnessed many goals, as the meeting ended with the victory of the Italian national football team 4-2 over Hungary, thus becoming Italy the first team to maintain its title in the history of the World Cup, and the first team to achieve World Cup twice in a row.

The World Cup Aas Suspended Due To The World War:

The World Cup was interrupted by the Second World War for 12 years, and it was restored in 1950. With this, Italy were the world champions for 16 years (from 1934 to 1950), the longest time for a team to hold the title of world champion.

During this period, the Vice-President of the International Football Association and the President of the Italian Football Association, Dr. Otorino Parasi, hid the World Cup in a shoe box, and put it under his bed throughout the Second World War, and with that image he protected it from falling into the hands of the occupation forces.

World Cup 1950:

The 1950 World Cup is the first since 1938, after a 12-year hiatus due to the circumstances of the Second World War. The last tournament was held in 1938 in France.

After the war ended, the International Football Association decided to compensate the 1942 and 1946 tournaments and searched for a country to host that tournament, but it failed to reach any European country that would host the event after that war, as the International Federation feared that it would not obtain sufficient resources to implement that tournament, even Brazil submitted a request Hosting the World Cup on its soil provided that it was held in 1950 (it was scheduled to take place in 1949), and Brazil’s offer was very similar to its bid to host the tournament in 1942 in addition to Germany.

1950 World Cup Final:

The 1950 World Cup Final was held at the Maracana Stadium, with an attendance of 200,000 spectators. It was and still is a record as the most attended final. The Uruguay team was able to defeat the owner of the land and the public, Brazil, and win its second title in the World Cup tournaments.

World Cup 1954:

The 1954 World Cup was held in Switzerland, and the announcement of the host country was made on the same day that Brazil was chosen to host the 1950 World Cup, as Switzerland was the only country that announced its willingness to host the tournament.

The 1954 World Cup saw the highest goal-scoring rate in the history of a World Cup final with an average of 5.38 goals per game.

1954 World Cup Final:

The 1954 World Cup Final was held at Wankdorf Stadium in the Swiss city of Bern. The final was attended by approximately 64,000 spectators. The final match brought together the West Germany and Hungary’s golden teams, in a meeting in which everyone expected that the victory would go to the Hungary team due to its excellent level at the time, but Germany Al Gharbia achieved the surprise, winning 3-2, achieving its first title in the history of the World Cup.

The Bernese Miracle:

After West Germany won the title, the Germans, through one of the media, called that match the miracle in Bern, referring to the Swiss capital, Bern, which the West German team won.

World Cup 1958:

The 1958 World Cup was held in Sweden, and this is the only time that the World Cup has been held on European soil and won by a team from outside the old continent.

It was announced that Sweden would host the tournament on June 23, 1950, in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, at the start of the 1950 World Cup.

For the first time in the World Cup tournaments, the 1958 World Cup received global television coverage, although Eastern European countries were unable to follow it because they were not ready to receive live broadcasts.

Unique in that edition, the teams of Wales, Northern Ireland, England and Scotland participated in the tournament, the first and only time that all representatives of British football participated. Also, the England national team was affected by the loss of some of its players in the Munich air disaster in February of that year.

1958 World Cup Final:

The Rasunda Stadium in the Swedish municipality of Solna, which accommodates 35,000 spectators, hosted the 1958 World Cup final, which was held on June 29, 1958, between the host Sweden team led by Nils Liedholm and Gunnar Green and the Brazilian team led by Fava with Garrincia, Mario Zagallo and Pele.

The Brazilian national team, led by its stars, managed to overturn its goal with a clean goal to win a broad 5-2, in a meeting that witnessed the beginning of the world player nicknamed the Black Jewel Pele at the age of not more than seventeen, to get Brazil the first world title in the history of the World Cup tournaments.

World Cup 1962:

The 1962 World Cup was held in Chile after the International Football Association was forced to choose a Latin country, due to the establishment of the previous two versions in 1954 and 1958 in European countries, for fear of boycotting the South American teams, as happened in the 1938 World Cup.

Chile was able to defeat Argentina and win the hosting of the tournament, after Argentina was a strong candidate to host the tournament.

Battle of Santiago:

The Battle of Santiago is a football match between the host Chile and Italy on the second of June 1962 in the Chilean capital Santiago, which is considered one of the most violent matches in the history of the World Cup.

The match witnessed the expulsion of two players from the Italian national team, with the then English referee overlooking the expulsion of players from the Chilean team, which led to chaos between the two teams that reached quarrels and spitting, prompting the police to intervene more than three times and the match ended with the Chilean team winning 2-0.

1962 World Cup Final:

The Brazilian national team was able to qualify for the final, despite Pele’s injury, so Garrincha took on the role of his colleague and led Brazil to the final.

The 1962 World Cup Final was held at Chile’s National Stadium in the capital, Santiago, between Brazil and Czechoslovakia. Brazil won the title for the second time in its history, after winning three goals against one.

World Cup 1966:

The 1966 World Cup was held in England, which was able to snatch the honor of organizing the World Cup competition, so England was announced as the host on August 22, 1960 in the Italian capital, Rome.

The 1966 World Cup witnessed the boycott of all the teams of Africa and Asia for qualifying (with the exception of North Korea) because of what they saw unfairly from the International Football Association in the distribution of seats, as it allocated only one seat to Africa and Asia combined (ie, half a seat each), while it gave Europe has nine seats and South America four.

The First Mascot For The World Cup:

The 1966 World Cup saw the announcement of the first World Cup mascot, which was named Willy the Lion. Also, months before the tournament, specifically on March 20, 1966, the Jules Rimet Trophy was stolen by a thief during the public exhibition in the central hall of Monastir, and then it was found a week after it was stolen wrapped in newspaper, under a garden fence in a suburb of Norwood, south of London, and was found A dog named Pickles.

1966 World Cup Final:

The 1966 World Cup Final was held at Wembley Stadium in the English capital, London, in the presence of 96,924 spectators, in the largest sports forum in British history, in a meeting between the English and West German teams on July 30, 1966.

England managed to beat West Germany 4-2 in extra time, after the regular time ended in a 2-2 draw, where Geoff Hurst scored the winning goal in extra time. It is reported that modern technology was used to confirm the validity of the goal, but the analysis showed that the goal was incorrect as The ball did not go beyond its entire circumference.

World Cup 1970:

Mexico hosted the 1970 World Cup in its ninth edition of the World Cup from May 31 to June 30, and Mexico won the honor of hosting the tournament after defeating Argentina in the vote held in the Japanese capital, Tokyo.

The 1970 World Cup was the first tournament to be held outside Europe and South America, and the first to be held in North America.

The First Appearance Of Cards In The World Cup:

The 1970 World Cup witnessed changes in the qualification cards, which resulted in the participation of 16 teams from all continents. The change took a long time to include some rules and laws. Two substitutions were also allowed for each team for the first time in the history of the World Cup. The referees were also granted the right to raise the yellow and red cards after they were from accepted orally, and no red card was used in that tournament.

The Appearance Of The Color TV Broadcast Of The World Cup:

With the advances in the field of satellite communications, the 1970 World Cup attracted a new record for the audience following the tournament’s competitions. It was the first time that the public watched the matches live, and via color screens via color television broadcasts.

1970 World Cup Final:

The 1970 World Cup final was held at the Azteca Stadium, in front of 107,412 spectators, which brought together Brazil and Italy. The Seleção team, led by the Black Jewel Pele, won the title by defeating the Italian team 4-1. With this victory, Brazil became the first country to win the cup three times and own the Jules Rimet Cup After winning the World Cup in 1958 and 1962.

1974 World Cup:

The 1974 World Cup is the tenth tournament in the history of the World Cup, and West Germany hosted it from June 13 to July 7, where it won the honor of hosting the tournament, after West Germany made an agreement with Spain to support it in hosting the 1974 World Cup competitions. Germany supported Spain to host the 1982 World Cup.

A New Cup For The 1974 World Cup:

The 1974 World Cup witnessed the introduction of a new cup for the tournament, after Brazil’s possession of the Jules Rimet Cup in 1970, the International Football Association chose Italian artist Silvio Gazzaniga for the honor of creating the new cup, which was called the FIFA Cup.

Chilean footballer Carlos Casale made World Cup history when he became the first player to be sent off with a red card in his country’s match with West Germany, although red cards were approved in the 1970 World Cup, but they were not needed in that edition.

1974 World Cup Final:

The 1974 World Cup Final was held at the Olympic Stadium in Munich, the capital of West Germany, in front of nearly 75,200,000 spectators between two teams distinguished by a unique way of playing known as total football.

West Germany defeated its rival, the Dutch team led by Johan Cruyff, 2-1, as West Germany won the World Cup for the second time in its history after the 1954 World Cup.

World Cup 1978:

The 1978 World Cup was held in Argentina, which was decided to host the tournament at the International Football Association meeting in the English capital, London, on July 6, 1966, after its rival Mexico withdrew from the competition after winning the right to organize the 1970 World Cup. And in this tournament, the first World Cup sponsorship appeared, which was sponsored by Coca-Cola.

1978 World Cup Final:

Held the 1978 World Cup final on Antonio Vispockao Liberty last stadium in Buenos Aires, and in front of 71.712 spectators between the owner of the land and the public of Argentina and runners – up version of the team of the Netherlands, and was able to Argentina win 3-1 times when additional, after the end of the original time in a 1-1 draw, thanks to the goals of Mario Kempes and Argentina win the World Cup title for the first time in the history of the World Cup.

World Cup 1982:

The 1982 World Cup was held from June 13 to July 11, so Spain was chosen to host the tournament after Germany, which hosted the 1974 World Cup, withdrew.

The 1974 World Cup witnessed the participation of the first Asian Arab team, the Kuwait national team, and witnessed the participation of the Algerian team for the first time in its history. England returned to the world championships after an absence of 12 years, specifically from the championship they achieved in the 1966 World Cup.

Increasing Teams In The World Cup:

This edition of the World Cup was characterized by many exciting and enjoyable matches, and the 82nd World Cup was considered one of the most exciting tournaments after the 1970 World Cup. Before the 1978 World Cup.

Gijon Scandal:

The group stage witnessed many surprises, the first of which was the Algerian team’s victory over West Germany, 2-1, with the signing of Rabah Madjer and Lakhdar Belloumi. The same group between the teams of West Germany and Austria, the two teams agreed to end the match as it is, to qualify for the second round of the tournament at the expense of Algeria, in a match known as the Gijon scandal, forcing the International Football Association to hold the last matches of each group in The same timing to prevent the recurrence of manipulation of the results.

1982 World Cup Final:

The 1982 World Cup Final was held at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium in the Spanish capital, Madrid, on July 11, 1982, in the presence of 90,000 spectators, between Italy and Germany.

The Italian team managed to win the match 3-1. After the first half ended in a goalless draw, Italy scored 3 consecutive goals in 24 minutes, through Paolo Rossi, Marco Tardelli and Alessandro Altobelli, then Germany reduced the difference late in the meeting through Paul Breitner, and Italy won the title The first in 5 decades, and the third in its history after the 1934 and 1938 World Cups.

World Cup 1986:

The 1986 World Cup was held in Mexico from May 31 to June 29, and Colombia was chosen to host the World Cup in 1976 , but the Colombian authorities eventually announced in November 1982 that they could not afford to host the World Cup due to economic concerns to choose Mexico. On May 20, 1983 to host the World Cup, after its file received great acclaim and overcame the file of both Canada and the United States, a new method of encouragement appeared in the stands known as “Mexican waves”, which became a famous method in the whole world after that.

1986 World Cup Final:

The 1986 World Cup Final was held in Mexico City on June 29, 1986, at the Azteca Stadium, and 114,600 spectators attended the stadium, between the West German team and the Argentine team.

Argentina advanced first with two goals from Jose Luis Brown and Jorge Valdano, but the Germans equalized with two goals through Rudi Voeller and Karl-Heinz Rummenigge.

While the match was heading into extra time, Jorge Burruchaga surprised the German team by scoring the third goal for his country, and Argentina, led by Diego Maradona, won the World Cup for the second time in its history after the 1978 World Cup.

World Cup 1990:

The 1990 World Cup was held in Italy from June 8 to July 8, and Italy was chosen to host the competition among six other teams: the Soviet Union, England, Greece, West Germany, Austria and Yugoslavia.

Changing The Rules Of The World Cup:

Everyone considered the 1990 World Cup as one of the most boring tournaments. The goal-scoring rate decreased significantly, reaching 2.21, which is the lowest since the beginning of the World Cup. It was noted that red cards were frequently used, as they were used 16 times. The tournament witnessed boring matches and a lot of time wasting, which is what As a result, FIFA changed the rules of the tournament before the final match to avoid this, by stipulating that a rematch of the final would be held if it ended in a draw.

The International Football Association awarded the winner three points instead of two, and the law of returning the ball to the goalkeeper was changed by preventing the goalkeeper from catching the ball if it was returned from his teammate, and these changes were implemented starting from the 1994 World Cup.

1990 World Cup Final:

The 1990 World Cup Final was held in the Italian capital, Rome, in the presence of nearly 74,000 spectators, on July 8, 1990, between West Germany and Argentina, in a repeat of the 1986 World Cup Final.

The match ended with a clean goal for West Germany through a questionable penalty kick scored by Andreas Brehme in the 85th minute, to win the German machines their third title and avenge their loss in the 1986 World Cup final from Argentina.

World Cup 1994:

The 1994 World Cup was held in the United States of America, so the host country was announced on July 4, 1988 in Zurich, Switzerland. The 1994 World Cup witnessed the participation of 24 teams for the last time before it was changed to 32 teams starting from the 1998 World Cup, and a record was set In the number of fans who attended the competition, which amounted to 3.6 million spectators.

A Record Number Of Fans In The World Cup:

Moreover, a new record was set in attendance per match of nearly 69,000 per match, breaking the previous record of 51,000 in the 1966 World Cup.

1994 World Cup Final:

Held the 1994 World Cup final on July 17, 1994, at the stadium Ross Bowl in Pasadena, California, who has seen the presence of more than 94.194 spectators, gathered between the teams big, the Brazilian national team and the Italian team, in a meeting bis to the final of the 1970 World Cup famous.

The meeting witnessed the selection of the most winning teams of the World Cup at the time, as both teams had three World Cup titles in their pockets.

The Brazil team led by Romario managed to win the title after defeating Italy in a penalty shootout 3-2, after the original match time ended in a goalless draw, as well as the extra time where the match ended after Roberto Baggio missed a penalty kick, and thus Brazil became the most winning team with four World Cup titles. nicknames.

World Cup 1998:

The 1998 World Cup was held in France from June 10 to July 12 1998, and France was chosen to organize the tournament on July 2, 1992 in the Swiss city of Zurich. This tournament is the first to witness the participation of thirty-two teams instead of twenty-four in the previous tournament. 1994 in the United States of America, the 98 World Cup witnessed 171 goals being scored, which is the largest total number of goals scored in a single tournament in the history of the World Cup.

1998 World Cup Final:

The 1998 World Cup final was held at the Stade de France, which witnessed the attendance of 75,000 spectators, between the organizing country, the French team, and the 1994 World Cup title holder, the Brazilian team led by Ronaldo.

France managed to win 3-0, achieving the first World Cup title in its history, after a distinguished level of Maestro Zinedine Zidane.

World Cup 2002:

The 2002 World Cup was held in its seventeenth edition, jointly organized by South Korea and Japan. This is the first time (and so far the last) that two countries have co-hosted it, it is also the first time to be held in Asia, and it is the last tournament in which the defending champion qualifies for the finals without qualifying.

2002 World Cup Final:

The 2002 World Cup Final was played between Germany and Brazil at Yokohama International Stadium in Yokohama, Japan. This match was the first meeting between the two teams in the history of the World Cup. Brazil won 2-0 to win the fifth title, with two goals scored by Ronaldo.

The match witnessed the third consecutive appearance of the then Brazilian captain Cafu in the World Cup final, an achievement that no one had ever achieved in the history of the World Cup tournaments.

World Cup 2006:

The 2006 World Cup was held on June 9, 2006 in Germany after winning the vote held in July 2000 in Zurich, Switzerland.

2006 World Cup Final:

On the ninth of July 2006, after an exciting final in its events and result, the Italian national team was crowned champion of the 2006 World Cup for the fourth time in its football history, after beating its French counterpart 5-3 on penalties after the end of the original and extra time with a 1-1 draw at the Berlin Olympic Stadium, which witnessed the end of Unfortunate for the star Zinedine Zidane, as he thrust his head into the chest of Italian defender Marco Materazzi in the extra time, specifically in the 110th minute of the match.

World Cup 2010:

The 2010 World Cup was the first tournament to be held on the African continent, specifically in South Africa, where it was chosen after a competition with Egypt and Morocco to become the first African country to host the finals.

The World Cup in Africa:

Choosing Africa to host the 2010 World Cup was part of the short-term policy, which was abolished in 2007, to rotate the hosting of the event between continents.

2010 World Cup Final:

The final match of the 2010 World Cup was played at the First National Bank Stadium, led by English referee Howard Webb, and the final brought together the Netherlands and Spain, and this is the first time in the history of the World Cup that Spain reached the final of the World Cup, and the Netherlands team has not reached the final since 32 years, specifically since I played in the 1978 World Cup final, when it was a purely European final for the second time in a row after the 2006 World Cup final between Italy and France.

The final had the most cards in a World Cup final, and the number of cards earned was more than double the previous record of six in the 1986 World Cup Final between Argentina and Germany.

The number of cards earned in the match is 14 yellow cards, including nine for the Netherlands team, and five for Spain. John Heitinga was sent off after receiving two yellow cards. The yellow card given to Nigel de Jong after kicking Xabi Alonso in the chest in the first half, angered many, including Rob Hughes, who thought he should have been given a red card.

Spain, the European champion, defeated the Netherlands 1–0 after extra time, with a goal scored by Andres Iniesta in the 116th minute. Thus, Spain managed to achieve its first world title, and this was the first time that a European country won the competition outside the old continent.

world Cup 2014:

The 2014 World Cup, the twentieth edition of the World Cup, was held in Brazil after the International Football Association (FIFA) allowed the tournament exchange system between continents, which was canceled in 2007, and it is the first tournament to be held in the South American continent since Argentina hosted the eleventh edition. Ten of the World Cup in 1978.

It is also the first time to organize two consecutive World Cups outside the European continent after the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, and Brazil won the right to host this event on October 30, 2007.

Goal-Line Technology In The World Cup:

FIFA allowed the use of goal-line technology for the first time in the history of the World Cup tournaments, making this tournament the third tournament sponsored by the International Football Association (FIFA) to implement this feature after the 2012 Club World Cup and the 2013 Confederations Cup.

FIFA also approved the use of vanishing mist by referees for the first time at a World Cup finals. Which aims to help the referees determine where the defense wall stands before taking free kicks, where the referee determines and then draws a line along the place that is away from the place where the ball is kicked, that is, the place where the nearest defender is allowed, and the line disappears within a minute after that.

2014 World Cup Final:

It was the 2014 World Cup final between the team of Germany and Argentina at the Maracana stadium in the presence of 75 thousand spectators, in a repeat of Nhaiaa 1986 World Cup and the 1990 World Cup.

Germany defeated Argentina with a clean goal, scored by Mario Gotze in the 113th minute of the second extra period, becoming the first substitute to score in the World Cup final, giving his country the fourth world title, equaling the Italian team’s record.

Miroslav Klose, The All-Time Top Scorer In The World Cup:

Also in the 2014 World Cup, German Miroslav Klose was able to break the Brazilian Ronaldo’s record after scoring the 16th goal in the World Cup finals, thus becoming more than one record in the history of the World Cup and crowning the World Cup’s historical scorer.

Didier Deschamps Wins The World Cup As a Player And Coach:

The 2018 World Cup was held, the twenty-first edition of the World Cup in Russia, where Russia was able to win the honor of hosting the tournament after the decision of the International Football Association announced on December 2, 2010.

Russia beat three nominations in total, becoming the first edition of the World Cup to be held in Eastern Europe.

32 national teams participated in the 2018 World Cup, after the current format was maintained. The tournament witnessed the participation of Iceland and Panama for the first time in their history.

The International Football Association decided to hold the 2018 World Cup final at the Luzhniki Stadium, which has a capacity of 81,000 spectators, after renovation.

The World Cup witnessed a new historical event, where the mouse technique was used for the first time in the history of the World Cup. The first arbitration case in which the referee resorted to using the mouse technique was in the France-Australia match, where the referee confirmed the presence of a violation by Australian player Josh Risdon against French striker Antoine Griezmann.

While the first goal to be canceled using the mouse technique was in the Iran-Spain match, where the Iranian Saeed Ezzatollah scored a goal in the 60th minute, but after returning to the mouse technique, the goal was canceled due to the offside that was on the Iranian player Ramin Rezaian.

World Cup Final 2018:

He managed the France team to win the title for the second time in its history after beating the team of Croatia 4-2, in the final of the 2018 World Cup which was held at the Luzhniki Stadium in the presence of 78.011 thousand spectators.

Stats Of The Teams In The World Cup:

  • Brazil is the most successful national team in the history of the World Cup
  • The Team That has Won the Most World Cup
    • 5, Brazil national team (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002)
  • The team with the most first and second places
    • 8, Germany national team (1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2014)
  • The Team that got the most in the top three
    • 12, Germany national team (1934, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014)
  • The team with the highest number of first four places
    • 13, Germany national team (1934, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014)
  • The team with the most top 16 spots
    • 21, brazil (all championship)
  • The most popular team in the World Cup
    • 21, Brazil national team (all tournament)
  • The team with the most second place
    • 4, Germany national team (1966, 1982, 1986, 2002)
  • The team with the most third place
    • 4, Germany national team (1934, 1970, 2006, 2010)
  • The team with the most 4th place
    • 3, Uruguay national team (1954, 1970, 2010)
  • The most eliminated team in the semi-finals
    • 5, Germany national team (1934, 1958, 1970, 2006, 2010)
  • Most eliminated team in the quarter-finals
    • 8, England national team (1950, 1954, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 2002, 2006)
  • Most eliminated team in the round of 16
    • 14, Mexico national team (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
  • The most eliminated team in the first round
    • 8, South Korea (1954, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006, 2014, 2018) and Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
  • The Confederation of African Football has won the most World Cup title
    • 12, UEFA (1934, 1938, 1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1990, 1998, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
  • The Confederation of African Football played the most in the World Cup final
    • 28, UEFA (2 in 1934, 2 in 1938, 2 in 1954, 1958, 1962, 2 in 1966, 1970, 2 in 1974, 1978, 2 in 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2 in 2006, 2 in 2010, 2014, 2 in 2018)
  • The association with the largest number of teams that have qualified for the finals at least once
    • 90% (9 out of 10), South America (all except Venezuela)
  • A league with the fewest teams that have qualified for the finals at least once
    • 15.38% (2 out of 11 current and 2 previously), Oceania Confederation (only Australia and New Zealand)
  • The team that won the World Cup twice in a row
    • 2, Italy national team (1934-1938) and Brazil national team (1958-1962)
  • The team that gets first and second places in a row
    • 3, Germany national team (1982-1990) and Brazil national team (1994-2002)
  • The team that gets the first three places in a row
    • 4, Germany national team (2002-2014)
  • The team that gets the first four places in a row
    • 4, Germany national team (2002-2014)
  • The team that gets the top eight places in a row
    • 16, Germany national team (1954-2014)
  • The team that gets the first 16 places in a row
    • 21, Brazil (1930-2018)
  • The team that takes second place in a row
    • 2, Netherlands national team (1974-1978) and West German national team (1982-1986)
  • The team that ranked third in a row
    • 2, Germany national team (2006-2010)
  • The team that gets 3rd to 4th place
    • 2, Sweden national team (1938-1950), Brazil national team (1974-1978), France national team (1982-1986), Germany national team (2006-2010)
  • Longest time to win the World Cup
    • 44 years old, Italy (1938-1982)
  • Longest period to get first and second places
    • 48 years old, Argentina (1930-1978)
  • Longest period to get the first three places
    • 48 years old, Argentina (1930-1978)
  • Longest period to get the first four places
    • 60 years old, Spain (1950-2010)
  • Longest time to get into the World Cup Finals
    • 56 years: Egypt (1934-1990), Norway (1938-1994)
  • Longest reigning world champion
    • Italy: 16 years, 1 month and 6 days (June 10, 1934 – July 16, 1950).

Host Team:

  • Best World Cup result by the home team
  • Champion: Uruguay (1930), Italy (1934), England (1966), West Germany (1974), Argentina (1978), France (1998)
  • Worst World Cup achievement by the host team
  • 17th – 32nd place (FIFA Final Ranking 20): South Africa (2010)
  • Best Achievement by a Title Holder
  • Champion: Italy (1938), Brazil (1962)
  • Worst achievement by the title holder
  • Not involved: Uruguay (1934)
  • Worst achievement by defending the champion who participates in the next tournament
  • Group stage: Italy (1950), Brazil (1966), France (2002), Italy (2010), Spain (2014), Germany (2018)
  • Best result by a team that debuted in the World Cup
  • Champion: Uruguay (1930), Italy (1934)
  • Third place: Portugal (1966), Croatia (1998)
  • The team that reached the World Cup final more than once without becoming a champion
  • 3, Netherlands national team (1974, 1978, 2010)
  • A team that gets to the top three without ever being a champion
  • 4, Netherlands national team (1974, 1978, 2010, 2014)
  • A team that gets to the top four without ever being a champion
  • 5, Netherlands national team (1974, 1978, 1998, 2010, 2014)
  • The team that participated in the most World Cup and did not advance from the first round
  • 8, Scotland National Team (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
  • An unbeaten team in the World Cup final
  • 2, Uruguay national team (1930, 1950)
  • A team that has not lost in the semi-finals of the World Cup
  • 5, Argentina national team (1930, 1978, 1986, 1990, 2014)
  • An unbeaten team in the quarter-finals (or best of eight rounds)
  • 2nd place, Croatia (1998, 2018) and Portugal (1966, 2006)
  • She played most of the Round of 16 (from 1986 to present), never losing
  • 8, Germany (1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014)
  • Teams that participated in the World Cup and did not win a match
  • 3, Bolivia (1930, 1950, 1994), Honduras (1982, 2010, 2014), Egypt (1934, 1990, 2018)
  • The teams that have played the most in the final together
  • 3, Argentina vs Germany (1986, 1990, 2014).
  • The team that has surpassed the most in the first round of the World Cup
  • 18, Brazil national team (every tournament except 1930, 1934 and 1966)
  • The team that advanced from the first round group chair
  • 15, Brazil national team (1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
  • The team that got the most out of the first round
  • 8, Scotland National Team (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
  • Most posts always progress from the first round
  • 3, Republic of Ireland (1990, 1994, 2002)
  • The fewest entries reached the quarter-finals
  • 1st place, Cuba (1938), Wales (1958), East Germany (1974), Ukraine (2006)
  • The fewest entries and reached the semi-finals
  • 2, Turkey national team (2002)
  • Most of the entries did not reach the semi-finals
  • 16, Mexico national team (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
  • Fewest matches, and reached the final
  • 5, Croatia (2018)
  • Least appearance in the World Cup, and won the title
  • 13, Uruguay (1930, 1950)

Records of players in the World Cup:

  • Pele is the only player to win the World Cup three times
  • Pele is the only player to win the World Cup three times
  • Pele is the player with the most World Cup
  • 3, Pele (Brazil, 1958, 1962 (played only in the first two matches; the medal was awarded retroactively by FIFA in 2007) and 1970)
  • The most popular player in the World Cup
  • 5, Antonio Carvajal (Mexico, 1950-1966), Lothar Mateus (Germany, 1982-1998), Rafael Marquez (Mexico, 2002-2018)
  • Most popular player in the World Cup Final
  • 3, Nilton Santos (Brazil national team 1950, 1958, 1962), Carlos Castillo (Brazil national team 1950, 1958, 1962), Pele (Brazil national team 1958, 1962, 1970), Pierre Littbarsky (Germany team 1982, 1986, 1990), Lothar Mateus (West Germany 1982, 1986, 1990), Cafu (Brazil national team, 1994, 1998, 2002)
  • (Ronaldo of Brazil has also appeared on 3 occasions, 1994-2002, but he did not participate in 1994).
  • The player who gets the first three places
  • 4, Miroslav Klose (Germany, 2002-2014)
  • Most popular player in the All-Star Team
  • 3, Djalma Santos (Brazil, 1954-1962), Franz Beckenbauer (West Germany, 1966-1974), Philipp Lahm (Germany, 2006-2014)
  • The most popular player in the World Cup matches
  • 25, Lothar Matthaus (Germany, 1982-1998)
  • Play the most knockout matches
  • 14, Miroslav Klose (Germany, 2002-2014)
  • The player with the most minutes in the World Cup
  • 2,217 minutes Paolo Maldini (Italy, 1990-2002)
  • Played most qualifying matches
  • 68, Ivan Hurtado (Ecuador, 1994-2010)
  • The player who has won the most World Cup matches
  • 17, Miroslav Klose (Germany, 2002-2014)
  • The player with the most appearances in the World Cup Final
  • 3, Cafu (Brazil, 1994, 1998, 2002)
  • The player who appeared with the World Cup with more than one team
  • 2, Luis Monti (Argentina, 1930 and Italy 1934), Robert Procinici and Robert Yarni (Yugoslavia, 1990, Croatia, 1998, 2002)
  • The player with the most appearances as a captain in the World Cup matches
  • 17, Rafael Marquez (Mexico, 2002-2018)
  • The player with the most appearances as a captain in a World Cup edition
  • 5, Rafael Marquez (Mexico, 2002-2018)
  • The player who appears as a substitute in the World Cup
  • 11, Denilson (Brazil, 1998-2002)
  • Youngest player to appear in the World Cup
  • 17 years 41 days Norman Whiteside (Northern Ireland) v Yugoslavia June 17, 1982
  • Youngest player to appear in a World Cup final
  • 17 years and 249 days Pele (Brazil) vs Sweden June 29, 1958
  • Youngest player to appear in a World Cup qualifier
  • 13 years, 310 days, Souleymane Mam (Togo), vs Zambia, May 6, 2001
  • Youngest player ever selected in the World Cup squad
  • 16 years and 339 days, Edo (Brazil), 1966
  • Oldest player to have played in a World Cup match
  • 45 years and 161 days, Essam El-Hadary (Egypt), Saudi Arabia, June 25, 2018
  • The oldest player appeared in the World Cup final
  • 40 Years 133 Days Dino Zoff (Italy) vs West Germany 11 July 1982
  • Oldest player, qualifying match
  • 46 Years 175 Days MacDonald Taylor Sr. (US Virgin Islands) vs Saint Kitts and Nevis February 18, 2004, 2006
  • Biggest captain in the world cup
  • 45 years and 161 days, Essam El-Hadary (Egypt), Saudi Arabia, June 25, 2018
  • The oldest player to appear for the first time in a World Cup finals
  • 45 years and 161 days, Essam El-Hadary (Egypt), Saudi Arabia, June 25, 2018
  • Oldest player ever chosen in a World Cup squad
  • 45 years, 150 days, Essam El-Hadary (Egypt), 2018
  • Biggest age difference in the same team
  • 24 years 42 days, 1994, Cameroon (Rigaubert Song: 17 years 358 days; Roger Milla: 42 years 35 days)
  • Biggest age difference in a champion team
  • 21 years 297 days, 1982, Italy (Dino Zoff: 40 years and 133 days; Giuseppe Bergomi: 18 years and 201 days)
  • Longest period between appearing in a World Cup Final as a player
  • 15 years 363 days, Mondragon (Colombia, 1998-2014)
  • Longest World Cup appearance as a player
  • 16-year-old Antonio Carvajal (Mexico 1950-1966); Elias Figueroa (Chile, 1966-1982); Hugo Sanchez (Mexico, 1978-1994); Giuseppe Bergomi ( Italy, 1982-1998); Lothar Matthaus (Germany 1982-1998); Rigobert Song (Cameroon, 1994-2010); Fred Mondragon (Colombia, 1998-2014); Samuel Eto’o (Cameroon, 1998-2014); Rafael Marquez (Mexico, 2002-2018)
  • Longest period between appearances at a World Cup in general
  • 44-year-old Tim (Brazil 1938 as a player and Peru 1982 as a coach).

Scoring record in the World Cup

  • The world cup’s all-time top scorer
  • 16, Miroslav Klose (Germany, 2002-2014)
  • All-time top scorer in World Cup qualifiers
  • 39, Carlos Ruiz (Guatemala, 2002-2016)
  • The historical scorer of the World Cup in one copy
  • 13, Just Fontaine (France, 1958)
  • The all-time top scorer in the World Cup in one match
  • 5, Oleg Salenko (Russia), vs. Cameroon, 1994
  • The world cup’s all-time top scorer in a losing match
  • 4, Ernst Willemowski (Poland), Brazil, 1938
  • The all-time top scorer in the World Cup final
  • 3, Geoff Hurst (England), West Germany, 1966
  • The all-time top scorer of the World Cup in all final matches
  • 3, Vava (Brazil), two goals against Sweden in 1958, one against Czechoslovakia in 1962. Pele (Brazil) two goals against Sweden in 1958 and one against Italy in 1970. Geoff Hurst (England), three goals against West Germany in 1966, Zinedine Zidane (France), two goals against Brazil in 1998, a goal against Italy in 2006.
  • Most matches with at least one goal
  • 11, Brazilian Ronaldo (Brazil, 1998-2006), Miroslav Klose (Germany, 2002-2014)
  • Most consecutive matches with at least one goal
  • 6, Just Fontaine (France, 1958) and Jairzinho (Brazil, 1970)
  • Most matches with at least two goals in the World Cup
  • 4, Sandor Kochis (Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine (France, 1958), Brazilian Ronaldo (Brazil, 1998-2006) and Miroslav Klose (Germany, 2002-2010)
  • Most consecutive matches with at least two goals
  • 4, Sandor Kochis (Hungary, 1954)
  • Most hat-tricks in the World Cup
  • 2, Sandor Kochis (Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine (France, 1958), Gerd Muller (West Germany, 1970) and Gabriel Batistuta (Argentina, 1994 and 1998)
  • Most consecutive triples in the World Cup
  • 2, Sandor Kochis (Hungary, 1954) and Gerd Muller (West Germany, 1970)
  • The fastest hat-trick in the history of the World Cup
  • 8 minutes, Laszlo Kiss (Hungary), scored in 69′, 72′ and 76′, against El Salvador, 1982.
  • Most goals scored by a substitute player in the match
  • 3, Laszlo Kis (Hungary), opposite El Salvador, 1982
  • Goals from a corner kick scored in the World Cup
  • 1, Marcos Cole (Colombia), vs. Soviet Union, 1962
  • A hat-trick from a penalty kick
  • Never in the final tournament, four qualifiers: Kubilai Turkelmaz (Switzerland) against the Faroe Islands, October 7, 2000, 2002 UEFA Group A; Henrik Larsson (Sweden) vs Moldova, June 6, 2001, 2002, UEFA Group D.

World Cup Penalty Shootout Records:

  • The team with the most penalty kicks in the history of the World Cup
  • 5, Argentina (1990, 1990, 1998, 2006, 2014)
  • The team with the most penalty kicks in a single World Cup
  • 2, Argentina (1990), Spain (2002), Costa Rica and the Netherlands (2014), Croatia and Russia (2018)
  • The most successful teams in penalty shootouts
  • 4, Germany (1982, 1986, 1990, 2006) and Argentina (1990, 1990, 1998, 2014)
  • Teams with the most penalty shootout wins in a single tournament
  • Argentina (1990) and Croatia (2018)
  • Which teams have lost the most on penalties?
  • 3, England (1990, 1998, 2006), Italy (1990, 1994, 1998) and Spain (1986, 2002, 2018)
  • World Cup copies of the most played penalty shootouts
  • 4, 1990, 2006, 2014, 2018
  • World Cup without penalty kicks
  • 0, 1978.

Overtime Records in World Cup History:

  • The team that played the most overtime
  • 11, Germany (1938, 1966, 1970, 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2006, 2006, 2014, 2014) and Italy (1934, 1934, 1938, 1970, 1990, 1994, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2006) )
  • The team that played overtime in various tournaments
  • 8, Germany (1938, 1966, 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2006, 2014) and Italy (1934, 1938, 1970, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006)
  • The team that has played in consecutive tournaments has overtime
  • 5, Italy (1990 – 2006)
  • The team that has played the most overtime in a single tournament
  • 3, Belgium (1986), England (1990), Argentina (2014) and Croatia (2018)
  • The team that has played overtime consecutively in one tournament
  • 3, England (1990) and Croatia (2018)
  • The team that won the most in overtime
  • 5, Italy (1934, 1938, 1970, 1994, 2006)
  • The team that lost the most in overtime
  • 3, Germany (1966, 1970, 2006)
  • Most consecutive wins in one round (excluding replays and penalties)
  • 2, England (1990)
  • Teams playing more than once in overtime
  • 3- England vs Germany (1966, 1970, 1990).

Tie-Breaking records in World Cup history:

  • Situations in which replay has been used
  • 1934 Quarter-finals – to determine who advances to the semi-finals (Italy vs. Spain)
  • Round of 16 1938 – to determine who qualified for the quarter-finals (Switzerland vs. Germany) and (Cuba vs. Romania).
  • 1938 Quarter-finals – to determine who qualified for the semi-finals (Brazil vs Czechoslovakia)
  • Cases where qualifiers have been used
  • 1954 Group Stage – for second place in Group 2 (West Germany vs. Turkey) and Group 4 (Switzerland vs. Italy)
  • 1958 Group Stage – for second place in Group 1 (Northern Ireland vs. Czechoslovakia), Group 3 (Wales vs. Hungary) and Group 4 (Soviet Union vs. England)
  • The cases in which the lottery has been drawn
  • Group stage 1954 – to determine first place in Group A (Brazil before Yugoslavia) and Group C (Uruguay before Austria).
  • Group stage 1970 – first place in Group A (Soviet Union ahead of Mexico)
  • 1990 Group Stage – 2nd place (Republic of Ireland) and 3rd place (Netherlands) in Group F
  • Cases where fair play has been used
  • Group Stage 2018 – runner-up in Group H (Japan beat Senegal due to fewer yellow cards

World Cup Coaches Record:

  • Helmut Schön, the coach with the most matches in the World Cup
  • Helmut Schön, the coach with the most matches in the World Cup
  • The coach who supervises the most World Cup matches
  • 25, Helmut Schön (West Germany, 1966-1978)
  • The coach with the most matches in the World Cup
  • 16, Helmut Schön (West Germany, 1966-1978)
  • The coach with the most World Cup title
  • 2, Vittorio Pozzo (Italy, 1934-1938)
  • The coach with the most attendance at the World Cup
  • 6, Carlos Alberto Parreira (1982, 1990-1998, 2006, 2010)
  • The coach who supervises the most national teams in the World Cup
  • 5, Bora Milutinovic (Mexico, 1986; Costa Rica, 1990; United States, 1994; Nigeria, 1998; China, 2002), Carlos Alberto Parreira (Kuwait, 1982; United Arab Emirates, 1990; Brazil, 1994 and 2006; Saudi Arabia, Arabia , 1998, South Africa, 2010)
  • The coach with the most attendance in successive championships
  • 5, Bora Milutinovic (Mexico, 1986; Costa Rica, 1990; United States, 1994; Nigeria, 1998; China, 2002)
  • The coach with the most attendance in successive tournaments with the same team
  • 4, Walter Winterbottom (England, 1950–1962); Helmut Schön (West Germany, 1966-1978) (note that Sepp Herberger led Germany/West Germany to four championships, (1938, 1954, 1958, 1962) omitting the 1950 competition from which Germany was banned).
  • The coach with the most consecutive wins
  • 11, Luiz Felipe Scolari (Brazil, 2002, 7 wins; Portugal, 2006, 4 wins – Portugal “won” their next match, the quarter-final against England, on penalties, which technically counts as a draw)
  • Most consecutive matches without losing
  • 12, Luiz Felipe Scolari (Brazil 2002, 7 matches, Portugal 2006, 5 matches).
  • The youngest coach in the history of the World Cup
  • 27 years and 267 days, Juan José Tramotola (Argentina, 1930)
  • Youngest coach, won the World Cup title
  • 31 years and 252 days, Alberto Specci (Uruguay, 1930)
  • The greatest coach in the history of the World Cup
  • 71 years and 317 days, Otto Rehhagel (Greece, 2010)
  • Oldest coach, won the World Cup title
  • 59 years, 200 days, Vicente del Bosque (Spain, 2010)
  • The fastest substitution ever made by a coach
  • 4th minute, Cesar Maldini, Giuseppe Bergomi for Alessandro Nesta (Italy vs. Austria, 1998); Sven-Goran Eriksson, Peter Crouch to Michael Owen (England, watch Sweden match, 2006)
  • The first to win the World Cup as a player and coach
  • 3, Mario Zagallo, Brazil (1958 and 1962 as a player, 1970 as a coach)
  • Who participated in the World Cup as a player and coach?
  • 5, Mario Zagallo, Brazil (1958 and 1962 as a player, 1970, 1974 and 1998 as coach); Franz Beckenbauer, West Germany (1966-1974 as a player, 1986 and 1990 as coach); Berti Vogts, West Germany (1970-1978 as a player, 1994 and 1998 as coach); Diego Maradona, Argentina (1982-1994 as a player, 2010 as a coach)
  • Won the World Cup as a player and head coach
  • Mario Zagallo, Brazil (1958 and 1962 as player, 1970 as coach), Franz Beckenbauer, West Germany (1974 as player, 1990 as coach) and Didier Deschamps, France (1998 as player, 2018 as coach)
  • The first player in the World Cup to coach a team in the World Cup
  • Milorad Arsenjevic, Serbia (1930 as player, 1950 as coach, both times for Yugoslavia)
  • The best result of a foreign coach in the World Cup
  • Runner-up, George Raynor (England, coached Sweden in 1958) and Ernst Abel (Austria, coached Holland in 1978)

Refereeing Record In The World Cup:

  • The referee who refereed the most World Cup matches
  • 11- Ravshan Irmatov (Uzbekistan 2010-2018)
  • Most referees officiated in a single tournament
  • 5- Benito Archondia (Mexico 2006), Horacio Elizondo (Argentina 2006), Ravshan Irmatov (Uzbekistan 2010) and Nestor Pitana (Argentina, 2018).
  • The youngest referee in the history of the World Cup
  • 24 years 193 days – Juan Gardezbal (Spain, 1958)
  • The greatest referee in the history of the World Cup
  • 53 years and 236 days – George Reader (England, 1950)

Disciplinary Record In The History Of The World Cup:

  • The fastest card in the history of the World Cup
  • 11 seconds, Jesus Gallardo (Mexico), vs Sweden, 2018
  • The fastest expulsion in the history of the World Cup
  • 56 seconds, Jose Batista (Uruguay), vs. Scotland, 1986
  • Fastest expulsion in a World Cup qualifying match
  • 37 seconds, Rashid Al Houti (Bahrain), Iran, 2014 World Cup qualifiers
  • Card during the penalty shootout
  • During the penalty shootout: Edinho (Brazil), vs France 1986; Carlos Roa (Argentina) vs England, 1998
  • He was sent off after a penalty shootout
  • After the penalty shootout: Leandro Coffrey (Argentina), vs Germany, 2006 (Covery received a red card for kicking Per Mertesacker in a post-match scuffle)
  • kicked off the bench
  • Claudio Caniggia (Argentina) vs Sweden, 2002
  • Most Received Cards (All Time, Player)
  • 7, Javier Mascherano (Argentina, 2006-2018) [23]
  • Receiving a ban in more than one copy (every time, player)
  • 2, Rigobert Song (Cameroon, 1994 and 1998) and Zinedine Zidane (France, 1998 and 2006)
  • Most Ejections (Championship)
  • 28 (in 64 games), 2006
  • The team whose players have received the most expulsion
  • 11 (in 97 matches) Brazil
  • Most expulsions in a single match
  • 4 (2 each) in Portugal vs Holland, 2006 (also known as the Battle of Nuremberg)
  • Most expulsions in a final match
  • 2, Pedro Monzon and Gustavo Desotti (both Argentina), v West Germany, 1990
  • The largest number of cards in one copy
  • 345 (in 64 games), 2006
  • Most warnings (one match, one team)
  • 9, Portugal, 2006, Netherlands, 2010
  • Most warnings (match, both teams)
  • 16 – Portugal vs. Holland, June 25, 2006; Cameroon vs Germany, June 11, 2002
  • Most warnings (match, player)
  • 3 (61′, 90′, 93′) Josip Simonic (Croatia), v Australia, 2006 (Referee: Graham Ball)
  • Most warnings (final match, both teams)
  • 14, 5 (Spain) and 9 (Netherlands) 2010

Record Of Matches Played And Goals Scored In World Cup History:

  • Brazil, the most victorious team in the history of the World Cup
  • Brazil is the most victorious team in the history of the World Cup
  • Play the most number of matches
  • 109, Germany, Brazil
  • Play the least number of matches
  • 1, Indonesia (eg Dutch East Indies)
  • The most victorious team in the history of the World Cup
  • 73, Brazil
  • The most losing team in the history of the World Cup
  • 27, Mexico
  • The team with the most draws in the history of the World Cup
  • 21, Italy, England
  • Most matches are played without winning
  • 9, Honduras
  • Most matches played until the first win
  • 17, Bulgaria
  • Most goals scored by a team
  • 229, Brazil
  • The team with the most goals
  • 125, Germany
  • The team that scored the fewest goals
  • 0, Canada, China, Indonesia (as Dutch East Indies), Trinidad and Tobago, Democratic Republic of the Congo (as Zaire)
  • The team that conceded the fewest goals
  • 2, Angola
  • best goal difference
  • +124, Brazil
  • Worst goal difference
  • -38, Mexico
  • Most matches are played without a goal
  • 3, Canada, China, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire)
  • Highest average goals scored in a single match
  • 2.72, Hungary (87 goals in 32 matches)
  • Lowest average goals conceded in a single match
  • 0.67, Angola (2 goals in 3 matches)
  • Most of the matches are between two teams
  • 7 times, Brazil vs Sweden (1938, 1950, 1958, 1978, 1990 and twice in 1994), Germany vs Yugoslavia / Serbia (1954, 1958, 1962, 1974, 1990, 1998 and 2010) and Argentina vs Germany (1958, 1966). , 1986, 1990, 2006, 2010 and 2014)
  • Most matches between two teams are in the knockout stage
  • 5 times, Argentina vs Germany (final 1986, final 1990, quarter-final 2006, quarter-final 2010, final 2014)
  • Most matches between two teams, Final Four or Final (not counting the third-place match)
  • 3 times, Argentina vs Germany (1986 Final, 1990 Final, 2014 Final), Brazil vs Sweden (1950 Group Final, 1958 Final, 1994 Semi Final), Brazil vs. Italy (1938 Final, 1970 Final, 1994 Final), Germany vs. Italy ( 1970 semi-finals, 1982 finals, 2006 semi-finals)
  • Most matches between two teams, the final match
  • 3 times, Argentina vs Germany (1986, 1990, 2014)
  • Most frequent match without losing
  • Brazil vs Sweden, 5 wins and 2 draws
  • The most frequent match with a perfect record
  • Argentina vs Nigeria, 5 wins (1994, 2002, 2010, 2014, 2018).
  • Most played knockout match with perfect record
  • Brazil has eliminated Chile 4 times (1962 semi-finals, 1998 round of 16, 2010 round of 16, 2014 round of 16).
  • Most consecutive matches between two teams
  • 5 times, Italy vs Argentina (1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990).
  • Most consecutive matches between two teams in the knockout stage
  • 3 times, Germany vs Yugoslavia / Serbia (Quarter-finals 1954, Quarter-finals 1958 and Quarter-finals 1962), Argentina vs Germany (Quarter-finals 2006, Quarter-finals 2010 and Quarter-finals 2014)
  • Most consecutive matches between two teams, the final
  • Twice, Argentina vs Germany (1986-1990)
  • Most wins by knockout
  • 35, Germany
  • Most losses by knockout
  • 14, Germany
  • Most tournaments are unbeaten
  • 7, Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 2002)
  • He was eliminated from the tournament without losing a match
  • 3, England (1982, 1990, 2006)
  • He was eliminated from the tournament without winning a match
  • 6, Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1978) and Bulgaria (1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1986, 1998)
  • Most wins in one round
  • 7, Brazil, 2002
  • Few victories and got the World Cup title
  • 3, Uruguay, 1950 (of 4)
  • Most matches were not won by the World Cup champion
  • 3, Italy, 1982 (of 7)
  • Most times a non-champion has won (excluding a match for third place)
  • 6, Holland, 2010
  • Won all matches without extra time, replays, penalties or qualifiers
  • Uruguay in 1930 (4 matches), Brazil in 1970 (6 matches) and Brazil in 2002 (7 matches).
  • The team that scored the most goals in a single tournament
  • 27, Hungary, 1954
  • The team that conceded the fewest goals in a single round
  • 0, Switzerland, 2006
  • The team that conceded the most goals in a single tournament
  • 16, South Korea, 1954
  • Most matches went into overtime
  • 3, Belgium, 1986; England, 1990; Argentina, 2014; Croatia, 2018
  • Most of the minutes without conceding a goal
  • 517 minutes, Italy, 1990
  • Highest goal difference in a single tournament
  • +17, Hungary, 1954
  • Highest goal difference, world cup champion
  • +14, Brazil, 2002; Germany, 2014
  • Minimum goal difference in one round
  • −16, South Korea, 1954
  • Lowest goal difference, world cup champion
  • +6, Italy, 1938 and 1982; Spain, 2010
  • Highest average goals scored per match
  • 5.40, Hungary, 1954
  • Highest average goal difference per match
  • +3.2, Hungary, 1954
  • Highest average goal difference per match, Champions
  • +3.0, Uruguay, 1930
  • Most goals for a world cup champion
  • 25, West Germany, 1954
  • Fewest goals for a world cup champion
  • 8, Spain, 2010
  • Fewest goals scored, and he reached the final
  • 5, Argentina, 1990
  • He conceded the most goals, the champion
  • 14, West Germany, 1954
  • Most matches to qualify for the World Cup Finals
  • 22, Australia (2018)
  • Longest distance traveled in one qualifying campaign
  • 155,000 miles: Australia (2018)
  • The number of brothers on the same team in the finals
  • 3, Honduras (Johnny Palacios, Jerry Palacios, Wilson Palacios, 2010)

The Biggest Surprise In The Group Stage, According To FIFA Rankings:

  • South Africa (2010) 83rd – 2-1 win over France (9th)
  • The biggest surprise in the knockout stage, according to FIFA rankings
  • South Korea (2002) 40th – 2-1 win over Italy (6th)
  • The biggest surprise for a former champion, according to FIFA rankings
  • South Africa (2010) 83rd – 2-1 win over France (9th)
  • The biggest surprise for the defending champion, according to FIFA rankings
  • South Korea (2018) 57th – 2-0 Germany (1st)
  • The biggest surprise for a team ranked first, according to FIFA rankings
  • South Korea (2018) 57th – 2-0 Germany (1st)
  • continental records
  • The biggest surprise by an African team, according to FIFA rankings
  • South Africa (2010) 83rd – 2-1 win over France (9th)
  • The biggest surprise by an Asian team, according to FIFA rankings
  • South Korea (2018) 57th – 2-0 Germany (1st)
  • The biggest surprise by a European team, according to FIFA rankings
  • Slovakia (2010) 34th – 3-2 win over Italy (5th)
  • The biggest surprise by the Oceania team, according to FIFA rankings
  • Australia (2006) 42nd – 3-1 win over Japan (18th)
  • The biggest surprise by a North American team, according to FIFA rankings
  • Costa Rica (2014) 28th – 3-1 win over Uruguay (7th place)
  • The biggest surprise by a South American team, according to FIFA rankings
  • +15 – Ecuador (2002) 36th – 1-0 win over Croatia (21st)

World Cup Hat-Trick List:

  • Most triples in a single World Cup
  • 8, 1954
  • Fewer hat-tricks in a World Cup
  • 0, 2006
  • Most successful consecutive World Cup qualification attempts
  • Spain (1986-2018)
  • Most successive failed attempts to qualify for the World Cup
  • 20, Luxembourg ( 1934 – 2018 )
  • Most consecutive victories in World Cup history
  • 11, Brazil, 2-1 Turkey (2002) to 3-0 Ghana (2006)
  • Most consecutive matches without losing
  • 13, Brazil, 3-0 Austria (1958) (group stage) to 2-0 Bulgaria (1966) (group stage)
  • Most consecutive losses in the history of the World Cup
  • 9, Mexico, 1-4 France (1930) to 0-3 Sweden (1958)
  • Most consecutive matches without winning
  • 17, Bulgaria, 0-1 Argentina (1962) to 0-3 Nigeria (1994)
  • Most consecutive draws
  • 5, Belgium, 0–0 Holland (1998) to 1–1 Tunisia (2002)
  • Most consecutive matches without a tie
  • 16, Portugal, 3-1 Hungary (1966) to 1-0 Netherlands (2006)
  • Most consecutive matches score at least one goal
  • 18, Brazil (1930-1958) and Germany (1934-1958)
  • Most consecutive matches score at least two goals
  • 11, Uruguay (1930–1954)
  • Most consecutive matches scored at least three / four goals
  • 4, Uruguay (1930-1950) and Hungary (1954) (four goals); Also Portugal (1966), West Germany (1970), Brazil (1970)
  • Most consecutive matches scored at least six/eight goals
  • 2, Hungary (1954) (eight goals); As well as Brazil (1950) (six goals)
  • Most consecutive matches without scoring a goal
  • 5, Bolivia (1930, 1950 and 1994), Algeria (1986 and 2010), and Honduras (1982 and 2010-2014)
  • Most consecutive matches without conceding (clean sheets)
  • 5, Italy (1990) and Switzerland (2006-2010)
  • Most consecutive minutes without a goal conceding
  • 559, Switzerland (1994, 2006-2010)
  • Most consecutive matches conceded at least one goal
  • 22, Switzerland (1934-1994)
  • Most consecutive matches concede at least two goals
  • 9, Mexico (1930–1958)
  • Most consecutive matches conceded at least three goals
  • 5, Mexico (1930–1950)
  • Most consecutive matches conceded at least four goals
  • 3, Bolivia (1930-1950), Mexico (1930-1950)
  • Most consecutive matches conceded no less than five / six / seven goals
  • 2, South Korea (1954) (seven goals); as well as the United States (1930-1934) (six goals); As well as Austria (1954) (five goals)

World Cup Stats:

  • The biggest victory in the history of the World Cup
  • 9, Hungary 9-0 South Korea, 1954; Yugoslavia 9-0 Zaire, 1974 and Hungary 10-1 El Salvador, 1982
  • Biggest winning difference, qualifying match
  • 31, Australia 31-0 American Samoa, April 11, 2001, 2002
  • Most goals in one team match
  • 10, Hungary 10-1 El Salvador, 1982
  • Most goals in a match for both teams
  • 12, Austria 7-5 Switzerland, 1954
  • The biggest result of a tie between two teams
  • 4-4, England v Belgium (then), 1954, Soviet Union v Colombia, 1962
  • Most goals scored in extra time for both teams
  • 5, Italy 2-3 West Germany, 1970
  • Most goals from one team in the final
  • 5, Brazil, 1958
  • Most goals in the final match for both teams
  • 7, Brazil 5-2 Sweden, 1958
  • Fewest goals in the final, both teams
  • 0, Brazil 0-0 Italy, 1994
  • Biggest winning difference in the final
  • 3, Brazil 5-2 Sweden, 1958, Brazil 4-1 Italy, 1970, France 3-0 Brazil, 1998
  • Most single scorers for one team, one match
  • 7, Yugoslavia vs Zaire, 1974 (Dusan Bajcevic, Dragan Dzajic, Ivica Surjak, Josep Katalinski, Vladislav Bogicevic, Branko Oblak, Ilija Petkovic)
  • Most single scorers for one team, one championship
  • 11, 2018 (Mitchie Batshuayi, Nasser El Shazly, Kevin De Bruyne, Marouane Fellaini, Eden Hazard, Adnan Januzaj, Romelu Lukaku, Dries Mertens, Thomas Meunier, Jan Vertonghen, and a special goal by Brazilian Fernandinho)
  • Fewest goals scored in a World Cup
  • 70 goals, 1930 and 1934
  • Most goals in each match of the tournament
  • 5.38 goals per game in 1954
  • Fewest goals per match in a tournament
  • 2.21 goals per game 1990
  • Most of the matches are without a draw
  • 63 matches in 2018
  • Most consecutive matches without a negative tie
  • 36 matches in 2018
  • Most of the knockout matches are without a goalless draw
  • 16 matches of 2018
  • Most scorers in a single tournament
  • 122, 2018
  • Players who scored at least two goals in the tournament
  • 37, 1998
  • Players who scored at least 3 goals in the tournament
  • 21, 1954
  • Players who scored at least four goals in the tournament
  • 11, 1954
  • Players who scored at least five goals in the tournament
  • September 6, 1994 – Hristo Stoichkov (Bulgaria), Oleg Salenko (Russia), Romario (Brazil), Jürgen Klinsmann (Germany), Roberto Baggio (Italy), Kennette Anderson (Sweden)
  • Players who scored at least six goals in the tournament
  • September 4, 1954 – Sandor Kochis (Hungary), Eric Probst (Austria), Max Morlock (West Germany), Josef Hoeje (Switzerland)
  • Players who scored at least seven goals in the tournament
  • September 2, 1970 – Gerd Müller (West Germany) and Jairzinho (Brazil)
  • The longest distance traveled by a player in the history of the World Cup
  • 84 km, 2014 – Thomas Muller (Germany)

The Teams That Scored The Most Goals By Tournament:

  • 1930 World Cup: Argentina 18 goals
  • World Cup 1934: Italy 12 goals
  • World Cup 1938: Hungary 15 goals
  • World Cup 1950: Brazil, 22 goals
  • World Cup 1954: Hungary 27 goals
  • 1958 World Cup: France 23 goals
  • 1962 World Cup: Brazil 14 goals
  • World Cup 1966: Portugal 17 goals
  • World Cup 1970: Brazil 19 goals
  • 1974 World Cup: Poland, 16 goals
  • 1978 World Cup: Argentina and Holland, 15 goals each
  • 1982 World Cup: France 16 goals
  • 1986 World Cup: Argentina 14 goals
  • World Cup 1990: West Germany 15 goals
  • World Cup 1994: Sweden 15 goals
  • 1998 World Cup: France 15 goals
  • 2002 World Cup: Brazil, 18 goals
  • World Cup 2006: Germany, 14 goals
  • World Cup 2010: Germany, 16 goals
  • World Cup 2014: Germany, 18 goals
  • World Cup 2018: Belgium 16 goals.

Crowd At The World Cup:

  • Highest attendance at World Cup matches
  • 199854, Uruguay vs Brazil, July 16 1950, Maracana Stadium, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1950
  • Lowest attendance at World Cup matches
  • 300, Romania vs Peru, July 14, 1930, Positos Stadium, Montevideo, Uruguay, 1930
  • Highest attendance in a World Cup qualifying match
  • 162.764, Brazil vs. Colombia, March 9, 1977, Maracana Stadium, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1978
  • Highest attendance per match
  • 68991, 1994
  • Highest attendance in a single tournament
  • 3,570,000, 1994
  • Lowest attendance per match
  • 23.235, 1934
  • Lowest attendance in a single match
  • 390,000, 1934.

Related Articles

The 10 Best Players In The History Of The English Premier League

Best Players In The History Of The English Premier League: The history of the English Premier League has passed by many unforgettable stars such...

Fifa World Cup Stats Record And History

Fifa World Cup Stats: We present to you the figures and statistics of the World Cup through its long history through the championships and...

Top 10 Best Players In The History Of Inter Milan

Best Players In The History Of Inter Milan: Many unforgettable stars such as Javier Zanetti, Lothair Matthews, Walter Zinga and other stars who have...

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Stay Connected

22,046FansLike
2,466FollowersFollow
0SubscribersSubscribe

Latest Articles

The 10 Best Players In The History Of The English Premier League

Best Players In The History Of The English Premier League: The history of the English Premier League has passed by many unforgettable stars such...

Fifa World Cup Stats Record And History

Fifa World Cup Stats: We present to you the figures and statistics of the World Cup through its long history through the championships and...

Top 10 Best Players In The History Of Inter Milan

Best Players In The History Of Inter Milan: Many unforgettable stars such as Javier Zanetti, Lothair Matthews, Walter Zinga and other stars who have...

Best Squad In The History Of The Champions League

Best Squad In The History Of The Champions League: UEFA chose the ideal squad for the Champions League, and choosing the best squad in...

Virat Kohli Vs Babar Azam? Who Is Better?

Virat Kohli Born: 5 November 1988, Delhi, IndiaNickname: CheekuBatting: Right-handedBowling: Right-arm mediumRole: Top-order batsman Babar Azam Born: 15 October 1994, Lahore,PakistanHeight: 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)Batting:...

HEALTH